Nantucket Portraits

by Rob Smith on Sunday, August 14th

Where are you from, and when did you come to Nantucket?

I'm from Gainesville, Florida. I came here for the first time in 2006. I started working here in 2012... I'm usually here for about 7 - 8 months of the year.

What is it you do?

I normally like to mess with people and tell them I'm a dreamer, in a Cheech and Chong type accent. But actually I do orthopedic massage therapy and integrative massage and personal training. I think that human contact is the best way to heal people, on a mental and emotional level. And I've studied and learned a lot about human anatomy and injuries... torn ligaments, tendons, spinal problems... but when it comes to massage therapy,  people really like to be touched. We are increasingly isolating ourselves from each other, and there's lots of evidence to suggest that loneliness propagates disease. There are lots of people who pay just to have their hands put on them, and there's something to be said for that.

Can you tell us about your life as a musician?

I basically dropped everything else to pursue music, much to my father's chagrin. I was big into sports... I still like sports, I enjoy playing them, being physically active. But as soon as I touched the guitar I was like "OK, this is it..." There's a lot I love about playing, but for me it's more of a decompression valve. I don't think of it in terms of career, but I happened to meet some people that were various serious musicians, and we all started playing together. I find myself kind of on this ride with them. It's an interesting ride... we just love to improvise with each other, play off each other... I studied jazz in school, which inspired me to explore improvisation. I usually practice between 4 - 6 hours a day. That's about as seriously as I take it though... for me it's mostly just therapy.

How has working on island affected your career?

My work found a niche here... it really took off in a way I didn't expect it to. I got a lot of demand, mostly through word of mouth, and before I knew it I had more work than I knew what to do with. And it's really helping people... I found a real sense of value with my work here. I don't know if this is where I'm supposed to be, but being on Nantucket dramatically shifted my life. I have a really clear sense of purpose. It broke me out of abject poverty... I was living in an old broken down motor home before I came here. I wasn't really sad or anything like that, but now that I'm here I have more options. The money doesn't make me happier. But I found that to be validated with what you do, and have people want to tell their friends, and get really positive feedback... that's all very rewarding.

Any advice you'd like to give?

Don't get caught up in expectations. What happens in life is what happens. What you expect to happen is what pisses us off, and makes us bitter. The one thing we're guarenteed is our capacity to do work, and that comes in all shapes in forms... whether one wants to meditate in a cave, all day every day, or one wants to pursue some high corporate position. When I get up every morning I realize I have a mind and a body, and I can do stuff with them... I go out and do stuff with intention. I like the notion of the Wu Wei in Taoism... passive action. Engage in life. Experience life. Have dreams and ambitions. But don't get caught up in the results. Just experience it. At the end of the day, I come home and I don't dwell on how things turned out.

by Rob Smith on Sunday, July 31st

Tell us about yourself.

I'm from Amherst, MA. I came out here in '82 when my friend from high school told me to come out for the summer. We were staying with a local family, and one night my roommate came home drunk and told our landlord that we were devil worshipers, so they tossed us out. But I was working for Todd Arno and he told me I could live above the restaurant. So I've spent a lot of time working as a painter, and in restaurants. I had my own painting business for a while. I left the island for a few years to go study at UMASS, and a couple more years to go live out in Seattle. But around '92 I realized that I wanted to come back to Nantucket. My dream is to be a professional actor, and plan B is to be a house-painter and a community theater actor. So when I got to be a certain age, it occurred to me that I could put more effort into the dream of full-time professional acting, so I started spending winters in New York, trying to integrate with the theater community there. I've been working with the Naked Angels... it's the longest standing readers-theater/writers workshop in New York. And I've found some great success in that.

A year ago February, I was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. I had 40% of my pancreas and some of my small intestine removed, a few rounds of chemo... But I sailed through it with a lot of support from this island, and from the theater community in New York. I was very lucky that my family was able to get me a small apartment in Boston, where I could stay during my treatment. I had my last treatment in November of last year, and so far so good. We think that we managed to nip it in the bud. But I won't really know until 5 years out.

Since my diagnosis, I'm down 80 pounds. I'm biking everywhere, I've been fishing, my blood pressure is great... Honestly, I can't complain about the cancer at all. It got me out of some bad habits.

Any advice you'd like to give?

If you wanna be an actor, there are so many ways to get into it. Even if you're shy and you don't want to be on stage, there's reader's theater, armchair theater... Nantucket has the short play festival, the improv company, three theaters... Lots of options. The more theater the better. Also, don't think too much. They always say "no acting, please." You see these people who get up on stage and they're very dramatic, and they're overly dramatic... and to the audience it's not very convincing, because nobody acts like that in real life. Certainly there are characters that are written to be that way, but for the most part over-acting doesn't sell. So be natural.

Most importantly, figure out what you want to do. When you figure that out, go for it. Do it. Don't let anybody tell you not to. Unless it's smack, or crack... other hard drugs. You can forget about those things. But do other things in moderation. Everything in moderation, except for love and passion.
 

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Robert Smith is a local landscape and portrait photographer. He will soon begin building a website to feature his work, and will also shortly provide links to his Flickr and Instagram accounts. He can be reached at 508-221-6926

by Rob Smith on Sunday, June 19th

Tell us about yourself.

I was born in New York City, raised in Michigan... Some of my friends had spent some time out here working, and I came to check it out. It felt like I was always supposed to be here, so I came out in 1994. I was set on surfing... I was obsessed with the sun, the beach... I'd be out there until the skin was peeling off my face. I was crazy about it.

You're a musician... tell us about your life as a guitarist.

I have a picture from when I was two years old, sitting on a speaker at my parents house, playing a little plastic string guitar. It was just something I was drawn to. When I was growing up, I would be at a friends house, and everyone else would be talking or watching TV or something, and I would just get hyper focused for hours playing the guitar. It's just been in my life from very early on. I used to play a lot of heavy metal. When I started playing classical guitar, I became very snobby, but recently I began incorporating more from my musical past. Some of it is a little reminiscent of Angus Young's style. I think some of that metal stuff actually transfers really well to the nylon-string guitar. I'm gonna start playing out more... I'm hoping to play at venues with good acoustics. My style sort of needs a space to carry some of those notes... some of these chords really deserve to be sustained.

What do you do to supplement the (sometimes lacking) income of a musician?

I run a window-cleaning business... I was bouncing around from job to job for a long time, kinda wondering what it was I wanted to do. I worked for a window-cleaning company, and decided to start my own business. For me it's important to be active. It also requires balance, especially up on ladders, and it can be a very meditative. Believe it or not it reminds me a lot of surfing...  And at this point, I have good relationships with a lot of clients, and it's really rewarding.

What's your favorite part about living on Nantucket?

When I moved here, one of the first things that struck me was how easy it is to bike everywhere. And I mean everywhere. It's so liberating. You just can't get that in some other communities.

(Unfortunately we had to cut our interview short)

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Robert Smith is a local landscape and portrait photographer. He will soon begin building a website to feature his work, and will also shortly provide links to his Flickr and Instagram accounts. He can be reached at 508-221-6926

by Rob Smith on Sunday, June 5th

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

I'm from Red Hook, New york. I moved to Nantucket about eight years ago. I needed the opportunity to work and make money while I figured out what I wanted to do. I worked at Cinco, where I met a lot of people I still know today. And I worked at the UMASS field station with Sarah Oktay, and then did a little bird-watching with the Mass Audubon Society. But all the meanwhile I've worked in restaurants, and I've spent some time traveling as well.

Can you tell us about your new business, Big Hug Dumplings?

It's a mobile food-cart that I sell steamed dumplings out of. They're totally hand-made. I prep all the filling, roll them, steam them, and serve them. I love dumplings, but they're not that avaible at your typical restaurant, so I make them for myself. I had considered starting a food-cart, and everything sort of lined up to do so. Everyone thinks it's a family recipe, but I sort of just did it myself. I really wanted dumplings, and figured that other people might too.

I consider it to be a service. My concept of a business is to provide a product that will enrich someone's life; the money is secondary. What would a business look like if money didn't matter? Would a car-manufacturer provide people with safe, reliable, road-worthy cars if money wasn't an issue? That's my goal: to provide people with quality food, not just to make money.

What's your favorite part about living on Nantucket?

The energy, really... It sits well with me. Every aspect of the community lends itself to a really comfortable environment.

Where do you see yourself in ten years?

For now, my most solid vision is to have established a sustainable bed-and-breakfast in the Phillipines, where my parents are from, near the surf... to be able to host workshops, and be surrounded by like-minded people. I want to be able to grow my own food and to surf regularly. I love all this here, on Nantucket... but ultimately I don't think I really want to live in the states. I'm not rushing towards that BNB plan in the Phillipines, but ten years can go by really fast... it's hard to believe that I've already been here for eight years.

Do you have any advice you'd like to give to the readers?

I think that most people don't want to be given advice. I have advice for myself really, and that is to do what I do and really believe in it. And if other people see that, they'll either absorb and digest it, or they'll just move on. But you can't tell people how to do things. You can lead by example. Something will either resonate or it won't.

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Robert Smith is a local landscape and portrait photographer. He will soon begin building a website to feature his work, and will also shortly provide links to his Flickr and Instagram accounts. He can be reached at 508-221-6926

by Rob Smith on Sunday, May 29th

Tell us about yourself.

I'm from here... born and raised on Nantucket. Brought up in the school system, had a couple beautiful kids... I've settled into a beautiful, small-time carpentry career. I love rock n roll. Just tryin' to make things work. That's me.

Why carpentry?

It was convenient at the time, but turned out to be a calling. I remember finishing my very first day thinking "This is it... this is the job for me." You just get to create anything. At this point, most of my jobs are super fulfilling, small projects for friends or for clients who turn into friends. I'm really lucky in that regard.

Can you shed some light on the music in your life?

I'm not the best musician... it's just one aspect of my life where I get to be communal without any real strings attached. It's just a beautiful, pure form of communicating without needing to talk. My words are not my strong suit, so it's great to be able to meet in the middle and make music.
I just love music. I'm from a family of musicians. My mother is a piano teacher. Growing up, I would hear all these rudamentary melodies drifing up through the floorboards... my brothers and I would absorb all that, so I think that's probably where we derived our sense of melody. Music was always present in our house growing up, always. The dichotomy of it was that we always had to be quiet while the music was being played, because all the music lessons took place after school. So maybe that's where the pent-up, musical, melodic energy comes from.

What inspires you?

The beauty and simplicity of everyday life. Gotta be honest with you. My kids inspire me to be a better person, and to actually think about the lessons that I owe it to them to teach. My friends inspire me, work inspires me... age inspires me, but more in a fire-under-my-ass kinda way... it inspires me to actually do the things I want to do. And confinement inspires me... I like to do as much as is possible to do on one tiny island... within the realm of legality of course.

What's your biggest dream?

The dream is to keep on being intrigued by what I do daily. And I am. Right now, I'm living my current dream. And that's to be in a very fulfilling self-employed position, and to be surrounded by genuine, lovely people. And to be able to appreciate all that. There are some times when I don't appreciate it at all. When you realize that you haven't been appreciating something that you could otherwise be grateful for, it feels amazing. It's very uplifting.

And for all the things I've done and that I do, there's no ambition to make one thing or the other be the main focus. I want to remain diverse.

I'm psyched to be watching my kids and friends and loved ones keep on growing and blossoming... here's a general shout out to everyone I know: keep on rockin and doing your thing! If you want something, act on it in the moment, rather than delaying it for later. That might be coming from a complicated place within me, but so be it. It will fulfill you and keep you going. We plan a lot, and think about things that we want to do... it's nice to just do things and see if they work for us.

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Robert Smith is a local landscape and portrait photographer. He will soon begin building a website to feature his work, and will also shortly provide links to his Flickr and Instagram accounts. He can be reached at 508-221-6926

by Rob Smith on Sunday, May 15th

Can you tell us a little bit about yourself?

I was born and raised on Nantucket... I studied Earth Science and Ecology at Vassar College, and I've spent some time travelling. Right now my main focus is in radio production.

What was your biggest takeaway from school? Was there some invaluable experience?

I loved meeting people from all over, and interacting with them... we tend to think of college campuses as sort of isolated communities, but I found it to be quite the opposite... that was enriching. And I loved learning about the Hudson Valley, its history... learning about the town of Poughkeepsie, and its place both in the natural and socio-economic world. It's halfway between New York City and the Catskills, and I find that the way that nature and the economy overlap there is fascinating.

Can you tell us about some of your travels?

I took a gap-year before going to college... I didn't feel I was quite ready after my senior year of high school. I traveled to Argentina for a couple months, as a part of an ecological research expedition on Condors, and a couple other things... we spent some time in an araucaria forest, which is sort of a living fossil forest on the border of Chile and Argentina. Then I went on a cycling tour of Western Europe, starting in France and ending in Denmark... it was great. There's something different about traveling by bike. It's a great experience, but it's also really boring in some ways. There are some really long periods of time when it's just you and the road. So you spend a lot of time thinking, or blissing out... in your regular life you don't have a lot of time to sit and contemplate things. And you have more time to see the way societies are organized at that pace.

I like traveling at times of transition. It helps you calibrate and prioritize your life... decisions that are otherwise hard to make become sort of subconsciously made.

Can you tell us about your career in radio?

I did some more traveling in college. I did a Sea Education Association Semester, sailing from California to Hawaii doing plastics research. I'm really passionate about oceans justice and oceanography... we were studying bacterial growth on plastics in the ocean. But I realized that I found the actual process of research to be really boring. It's very rote, and precise... and some people are really good at that, but I didn't feel like one of those people. So I got back to school and I wasn't sure how to proceed with my studies in science. Someone suggested that I go to the radio station at Vassar, so I did. I love 'This American Life,' and I was exploring their 'How to Make Radio' page, and I ended up finding this wonderful radio school in Wood's Hole, right across the pond from us, where I ended up spending some time. So now I freelance for WCAI, and some other projects on the side.

What I really love about radio are these deep dives into a specific topic or story, for a month, or two months, or a week... or however long the story takes. And then you totally move on. Over time people tend to develop a beat as a reporter, but right now I do a lot of different kinds of stories. I love how any one story is attached to every other part of the world. Nothing exists in isolation... as a reporter, I get to learn how a story relates to the world at large. It's always a very educational experience.

What, in your estimation, does Nantucket need to move forward as a community?

I think that we have an amazing community here. But we're facing very intense economic and environmental forces that are going to demand that Nantucket changes. And that will either happen in a way that's out of our control, in a way that Nantucket slowly becomes a movie set. Or it can happen in a way that Nantucket can remain a real place... a real, authentic community. We need to invest in ways to make sure people can succeed. I'm not sure exactly what that looks like, but we need to have an open conversation where people are really listening. And people need to understand that they have skin in the game. Everyone's actions contribute to what Nantucket looks like, whether or not they think that they do.

We're gonna see sea-level rise, and it would be great to see a conversation about what to do when down-town starts to get submerged. Those buildings are historic, and they're valuable now, but they won't be later. But people don't want to think about that, which is challenging.
 

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Robert Smith is a local landscape and portrait photographer. He will soon begin building a website to feature his work, and will also shortly provide links to his Flickr and Instagram accounts. He can be reached at 508-221-6926

by Rob Smith on Sunday, March 20th

Where are you from?

"I'm from Pawtucket, Rhode Island."

What brought you to Nantucket?

"Maybe two or three years ago, my sister brought me here, saying that it was time to be an independent adult."

You practice Parkour... can you tell as a little about that?

"Parkour is a discipline of movement. It's also known as Free Running, some people call it Urban Gymnastics... I personally like to call it 'Adaptive Human Movement.'  Trainers try to use the body to really experience any given environment in the same way that a gymnast would experience a gym, or a martial artist would experience a dojo. To put it really simply, it involves a lot of running, jumping, vaulting and flipping, but in an open-air urban environment."

When did you start practicing?

"I was 12... I'm 21 now so about 9 years ago. I was in Junior High, and someone had dared me to climb a metal gutter-pipe on the side of our school. So I did that, I climbed about ten feet up. When I got down, one of my friends asked if I was doing parkour. And I was like, 'Par-what?' And he told me a little about it, and to go look up a video on Youtube. So I started watching some really experienced trainers online, and seeing what these guys could do with the human body really ripped open my impressionable 12-year-old mind, and I wanted to learn how they did that. But the sport wasn't very well-known back then... I didn't know anyone else who practiced so there was no real way to 'learn'... I had to study these videos and try and (carefully) replicate what they were doing."

Have you learned anything from your practice, besides the technical aspects?

"It's interesting... people who see parkour from a distance might at first think 'hmm, this person must be an adrenaline junkie.' Especially jumping roof-gaps. But interestingly enough, I find that parkour can induce a kind of zen. For instance, if I have a really bad day, I can go do parkour and then I'm just in the moment, and not all up in my head anymore. It's a physical type of meditation, I would say similar to yoga. I've also learned about overcoming fear. The obstacles are mental, as well as physical. And I've really learned to enjoy what I have, while I have it.

As I understand it, not everyone is too thrilled to see people practicing in public. Have you encountered any opposition to your training?

"Actually, I've been getting permission to get up onto a ton of rooftops lately, which is amazing. But that's certainly not always the case. Most people who frown upon it are worried about liability. They're afraid that we're going to hurt ourselves, and then sue them. I've personally never heard about a trainer suing anyone over bodily harm, though accidents and injuries do happen. As a community, we tend to be really respectful. We understand that we're responsible for our own bodies. Also, if I were to damage someone's property, I'd be perfectly willing to pay for it. Legally, it's kind of a gray area. Using your body to jump and vault over things is not illegal. But there's the issue of trespassing. A lot of places aren't posted, but If we ever get kicked out of somewhere, we demonstrate the utmost respect for whatever authority we're answering to, whether it's the property owner, a cop or what have you... Usually we're just asked to leave, and that's fine. There are plenty of other places to practice."

Any advice to people who want to start practicing?

"Absolutely. Don't be reckless. You always want to stay within your comfort level. Don't push yourself to do something you're not sure about. With more practice, certain obstacles come into your comfort zone. Until then, train within your limit. You don't want to do something that could leave you with an injury for the rest of your life."

by Rob Smith on Sunday, March 13th

When did you come to Nantucket?

"1998. Before that, Michelle and I lived in London, and found out about a good job on Nantucket. I was familiar with the Cape. I said that I'd heard really great things about Nantucket, and recommended she take the job if she could. She worked down at the Corner House for a season. So then we lived in New Zealand for nine years, her home country, and were on our way to Europe when a friend convinced us to come back and work for a season. So we did. I drove a taxi, Michelle did some landscaping. I decided to stay for the year, while Michelle went off to Europe. She came back the next year and we've been here ever since.

I love that this is a small community. It's well-educated. And because it's affluent, there's a lot of things going on. The affluence doesn't make Nantucket special except that it provides a fertile field for visiting scientists, artist... whatever it is, it happens here."

Can you tell us about the Nantucket Marine Mammal Conservation Program?

"That was started in 1982, by a woman whose name most people will recognize; Jean Rioux. There was a stranding of 13 pilot whales at Cisco Beach. The issue was that the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972, one of the most successful environmental laws that there is, had come into play, but Nantucket hadn't prepared for it. So we had a game warden on the island at that time who said that a big weekend is coming up. People are showing up, and I need to get these animals off the beach, and the only federal land on the island is the dump. So he made the decision to pull these living animals two miles across the scrub to the dump, where they died. There was a pretty big outcry, much of it lead by Jean. She got Green Peace out here, and there was national coverage of the issue. And from that issue, a stranding team was formed. And the Marine Mammal Conservation Program was formed. So for 30-odd years it's been an educational tool. We raise funds for ourselves, but a lot of the money goes to other organizations that are doing some scientific work, or to bring speakers out here."

What inspired you to study marine biology?

"I grew up in Northern California, not far from the ocean. I've always liked the ocean. I went to school in Alaska on a swimming scholarship. Marine biology wasn't my focus, but when Title Nine came in, a lot of schools lost their small sports teams. So I ended up going to another school with an oceanography department, Humboldt State University. So I was interested in the ocean. And I'll be blunt, I'm an animal rights advocate. I believe that animals should, in human terms, have rights. Cetaceans and other marine mammals in particular have evolved over 70 Million years. They've evolved from the ocean to the land and back. Some of the best digs for whale fossils are in the highlands of Egypt. They moved into the marshes. So to me, that they're still around... that's successful evolution. And they've got huge brains. That sperm whale hanging in the Whaling Museum had a brain seven times larger than ours. That's the largest brain ever known on the planet. That should give them some respect. They have languages, dialects, names... We know that bottlenose dolphins have different clicks for every member of their pod. That's a name. These are really intelligent creatures. That's what really drives my passion for animal issues."

Any advice you'd like to give to the readers?

"Keep an eye out on what's going on with the Marine Mammal Rescue Team. It's kinda miraculous that we've got the team together; we've jumped through a lot of hoops and come up with a whole different concept and approach for marine mammal rescue that the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration has never looked at before, and they (NOAA) said 'OK, we'll try it. We'll go your way. We'll make this work.' So that's gonna be a pretty big story for Nantucket and for marine mammals in the near-term. I really hope that we have the team up and running in full this summer.

I think that charismatic megafauna, like whales and dolphins... People love 'em. You can use knowledge of marine mammals as a tool to try to connect people back to nature. We're losing that connection, and that's really sad because once that's gone, it'll be gone forever. So I'd like to mitigate that. I'm hoping that the Marine Mammal Rescue Team will help get Nantucketers really keen on the ocean life around us. Remember, 95% of the biomass on this planet is in the ocean. The other 5%, everything from fungus to elephants, is on land. Everything else is in the ocean. And we're losing it. Every fishery on the planet is under stress. Some folks are reckoning that by 2050, there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish. So let's educate each other, and try to mitigate that."
 

Subject: Scott Leonard
Location: Downtown Nantucket
Date: March 13th, 2016

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Robert Smith is a local landscape and portrait photographer. He will soon begin building a website to feature his work, and will also shortly provide links to his Flickr and Instagram accounts. He can be reached at 508-221-6926

by Rob Smith on Sunday, March 6th

You never planned on running a farm. This sort of fell into your lap, didn't it?

"That's right. But when the opportunity presented itself, it seemed like a good idea. I worked for Dane DeCarlo and Katie Hemingway, helping out with the nursery and landscaping. They'd always wanted to do some farming in the back half of the plot, which wasn't really being used, but they decided they didn't want to keep the property. So I took over, so to speak. It seemed like a better use of time than just working for someone else all the time... I had felt like I was waiting for purpose. Then I was given the opurtunity to find purpose."

Do you have any goals when it comes to Boatyard Farm?

"I wanna grow as much delicious food as possible, and still have time to go sailing."

What's your favorite part about farming?

"Watching stuff grow. It's definitely the closest thing to magic. It's just amazing. You have this tiny little seed, and it becomes this giant plant. Seeing the greenhouse go from being this empty, cavernous space to a freakin' rainforest during the summer."

What's the hardest part of being a farmer?

"Making decisions. 90% of the time I've spent working on this farm has been doing things that failed, or were not a good idea to start with, or had to be completely undone. You just don't know. Also there's a lot of stuff that, at first glance, doesn't really seem like farming. Like the fact that it's a business. That's just a whole other skill set."

What have you learned in the last 2 1/2 years of running a farm?

"I've learned that any big goal, when it's been broken down into pieces, is juts a bunch of really simple tasks. If you look at it that way, anything seems a lot more feasible."

Any advice you'd like to give to aspiring farmers?

"I don't think I have any advice. I have no idea what I'm doing, and I expect that to be the case for quite some time. Actually, yes I do... you can't understand life, so you might as well enjoy it. It's a lot easier to do a lot of hard work if you're having a good time."
 

Subject: Carl Keller
Location: Boatyard Farm
Date: March 6th, 2016

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Robert Smith is a local landscape and portrait photographer. He will soon begin building a website to feature his work, and will also shortly provide links to his Flickr and Instagram accounts. He can be reached at 508-221-6926

by Rob Smith on Sunday, February 28th

What are your dreams for Nantucket?

"To see edible forest-gardens all over. The island needs to be reforested. I'd like to see the town start to take a stance and develop a plan for reinstituting a climax ecosystem. I see our community as incredibly dependent on the tourist industry, more and more so as time goes by, but in the meanwhile we're destroying our ecosystem, or what's left of it. A lot of people don't understand the history of Nantucket's ecology, and it's really important to understand that in order to move forward.
We use an economic system that relies on destroying virtually every ecosystem on the planet. We could and should be nurturing our local ecologies to produce more biomass, and more biodiversity, which would mean more (local) food. So I'd like to see more fruit trees and edible plants on public land. No more lawns. The concept for the modern lawn dates back to the early 17th century. The English gentry wanted to demonstrate that they could afford to own land, and yet do nothing with it. It was just a status-symbol. They didn't need to make money off their land. Normally, if you saw anything like that, it was on a working person's land used for grazing animals, or food production of some sort."

You're into mycology (the study of fungus). Can you tell us about how mycoremediation can help Nantucket?

"The issue of groundwater quality hasn't really been talked about that much. But the surface-water quality issues have come up a lot lately. Part of the problem is that there's just sand between our feet and the water-table which feeds into the harbor and ponds. Fungi can take most nutrients and chemical pollutants, and break them down into their basic elements. There's no one species that can do it all. It would require a whole lot of species to be present, especially mycorrhizal fungi, which are attached to the roots of trees and other plants, and grow 100 to 1000 times faster than the plant itself, aquire nutrients and water, and bring them to the trees in exchange for simple sugars. Those will be able to absorb and break down chemical toxins and heavy metals, rendering them inert. Fungi on Nantucket could help clean our groundwater, and help to recycle the biomass created by trees, as well as organic human refuse. Another obvious way to utilize fungus would be for food."

Do you have any advice you'd like to give?

"Learn about permaculture. People need to know how to take care of fruit trees, nut trees, berry bushes, leaf and salad crops, fungi... we need to be able to feed ourselves off of these things, and create agricultural systems that have an entropy to them. Our land needs to be able to carry the human species on a local level, so that we don't need to take advantage of other countries for food and other natural resources. Also, eat a high-fiber, low-glycemic diet."
 

Subject: Alden Lenhart
Location: Boatyard Farm
Date: February 28th, 2016

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Robert Smith is a local landscape and portrait photographer. He will soon begin building a website to feature his work, and will also shortly provide links to his Flickr and Instagram accounts. He can be reached at 508-221-6926

by Rob Smith on Sunday, February 14th

What's your name?

"Odin!"

How old are you?

"Umm... Three!"

What's your favorite part about living on Nantucket?

"Playing with my trains!"

What do you want to be when you grow up?

"A recycling guy."

What do you want to recycle?

"San Peligrino. I like the red kind, and the green kind. My mom and dad drink them. But my mom doesn't like the green kind, 'cause it's lemony. I like it though."

What does your mom do?

"She makes dolls!"

And what does your dad do?

"I don't know."

Where is your favorite place?

"The moon! It's made of rain!"

What's one piece of advice you'd give to everyone?

"Bring your toys everywhere you go!"
 

Subject: Odin MacKay
Location: His Bedroom/Arctic Camping Tent
Date: February 14th, 2016

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Robert Smith is a local landscape and portrait photographer. He will soon begin building a website to feature his work, and will also shortly provide links to his Flickr and Instagram accounts. He can be reached at 508-221-6926

by Rob Smith on Sunday, February 7th

Where are you from?

"Shreveport, Louisianna."

When did you get to Nantucket?

"1989. Me and my wife Ruth worked at DeMarco for five seasons, and then the Summer House for two. And then after we had Jack, our second child, we decided it wasn't gonna cut it... working the same hours, way out in 'Sconset... so this place [The Bistro] was for sale, and we decided we could split our shifts up. It just made sense. That was '97."

What brought you here in the first place?

"My brother used to work with Ruth. She was coming out here to work at DeMarco, and she needed a chef to work with her. So my brother called me... I met Ruth at DeMarco, and the following March we were married. That's how that happened. When we had our first child, Emily, we decided this was a good place to raise kids. Which it's turned out to be."

How did you get into cooking?

"Again, through my brother. He was working at a restaurant... I had worked in restaurants before, but nothing serious. He was working at a really fine place and I went to be the pasta guy at this Italian private dining club down in Louisiana. From there on I decided it was something really awesome, because it was something creative, and I could make a little money... a little."

What's your number one goal as a chef on Nantucket?

"I want our diners to experience well-prepared food, in a casual environment... stuff that's handmade with a lot of love and creativity. But no so unusually unaproachable that you would be afraid to eat it."

You play guitar as well. Tell us more about your musical life.

"I started playing guitar when I was fourteen. The South is very different in its approach to music and food. Down there everybody played something. And they didn't care if you went to school for it. And many people were great chefs who had never been to culinary school. You were much more likely to come across people who were great players, and great chefs, who just sort of knew how to do it. It's a constant there... I find music and food to be very similar. There's texture, and there's rhythm in both... there are things that are constant and classic that are worth following and understanding, but there's also a lot of new experimental stuff that can be fantastic. Music and food work very well together in my head. I'll be thinking of a new song arrangement for my band in cooking terms. 'It's not spicy enough, or not quite crunchy enough, or it's a little bland here...' On the flip side, you can give your audience TOO much... ideally you don't want to give them something that's too esoteric, whether it's food or music."

 

Subject: Tim Pitts
Location: Centre Street Bistro
Date: February 7th, 2016

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Robert Smith is a local landscape and portrait photographer. He will soon begin building a website to feature his work, and will also shortly provide links to his Flickr and Instagram accounts. He can be reached at 508-221-6926

by Rob Smith on Sunday, January 31st

What brought you to Nantucket?

"My dad has been traveling for years. He started out working for Something Natural. So my mom came up, then my brother. So I was the only one left in Jamaica. They would work and send back money, then one day I was like "you know what? I wanna visit the states." So I came up in late 2011 on a J-1, and here I am."

What inspired you to want to stay on Nantucket?

"The people here are very loving. Very loving, very kind. I see where I can be very sucessful in the future, if I work and save my money. But most of all, my lovely wife, who I met a year ago. It's been such a blessing, we are so much in love, and so happy."

Where do you see yourself in ten years?

"In ten years? I see myself having my own house, maybe a child, but just like I am now I'd like to be enjoying Nantucket and working hard."

What do you think you can get out of life on Nantucket that you couldn't get back in Jamaica, besides the financial oportunities?

"Peace and quiet. And simple things, like the look on a client's face when I detail their car. The look of satisfaction... it's not much but it's all I need."

What motivates you?

"My family, my wife's family, the support that they give me... it's more than I could ask for."

Is there any piece of advice you'd give to anyone reading this?

"My advice to the young people of Nantucket is to be hospitable, especially to senior citizens. Maybe 90% of my friends are senior citizens. I try to be as helpful as I can, and they know that I'm available if they ever need help with something."

Subject: Jay Parkes
Location: Tom Nevers
Date: January 30th, 2016

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Robert Smith is a local landscape and portrait photographer. He will soon begin building a website to feature his work, and will also shortly provide links to his Flickr and Instagram accounts. He can be reached at 508-221-6926

by Rob Smith on Monday, January 25th

How long have you been on Nantucket?

"I was born and raised here, and I went through public school here. I went off to college in Boston, where I studied as an undergrad and grad student. I came back right after grad school and got a job. I've been back for a year and a half."

What did you study, and where?

"I went to Wheelock College, where I studied Elementary Education, and Psychology as an undergrad, and then Special Education in grad school."

Where do you work now?

"At the Nantucket Elementary School, as a fourth grade teacher. It's super fun! My old 4th grade teacher is right next door to me. It's crazy."

That must take incredible patience. Eighth graders are 8, turning 9 right?

"They're 9 turning 10. They're as big as me."

What's the biggest challenge about teaching kids at that age?

"Believe it or not, half my class is already very mature. They have drama, and cliques... stuff like that going on, and then the other half is still very young, and remind me of what I was like when I was a 9 year old. It's kind of hard handling the different girl drama and bullying that's going on. The social-emotional piece of it can be really challenging. They've also all got phones, they're all on Instagram... they're definitely a lot more aware in a way that I wasn't when I was a kid."

What's the best part about teaching kids that young?

"They bounce back so quick. So when there are issues that require some behavior management, they're very quick to turn it around. The next day is just a fresh slate. And they also love you, as a teacher. They're so happy... they're still at that age where they're excited to be at school; I don't get the attitude about academics or anything like that. I'll say, "We're gonna learn about rocks!" And they'll be like "YEAH!"

What inspired you to start teaching?

"My sister has special needs; she's older than me, so I've always had her in my life. I think, through growing up and trying to show her and teach her things, she taught me patience in return. I learned about trying different approaches to situations. I want to find a way to engage every student, and then commit to that engagement, and get them to commit to it as well."

What would you say is the Nantucket Public Schools' strongest asset?

"It's a very supportive, close-knit environment. Everyone communicates very well. If I'm concerned about a student, I can email their teacher from last year, or the vice principal, or a counselor for example... There are a lot of different people to go to. There are even programs where we have a team of people help each other come up with strategies for teaching. Everyone is very accessible.

Any advice you'd like to give to readers?

"Try not to take things too seriously. Myself, and a lot of people today, get so wrapped up in the negativity. Sometimes you need to step back and take a look at the big picture, and say to yourself,  "Is this a big deal or not?"
 

Subject: Katherine Horyn
Location: Nantucket Elementary School
Date: January 24th, 2016

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Robert Smith is a local landscape and portrait photographer. He will soon begin building a website to feature his work, and will also shortly provide links to his Flickr and Instagram accounts. He can be reached at 508-221-6926

by Rob Smith on Sunday, January 17th

Can you tell us where you're from?

"I'm from Montego Bay, Jamaica."

What prompted you to move here?

"My dad went to college in Florida, and my aunt and uncle had a job up here on Nantucket through a work-visa program. They got their citizenship and decided to stay year-round. We would visit them in the summers. At one point, my mom decided it was time for me to go to America. In Jamaica, there isn't much opportunity for people to be able to advance. I think my mom recognized that I would get a lot more out of getting an education and living in America, so I went to go live with my dad in Florida. He had come to the states on an academic and athletic scholarship. I was there for three weeks and absolutely hated it! I loved Nantucket so much, so I begged and pleaded to come stay with my aunt and uncle. So I moved here back in 2005. I was 14, going on 15. It was the scariest experience of my life! I'd been coming here during the summer since I was younger, but moving here definitely was a huge culture shock. You know, it was my early teens; I was trying to figure out who the heck I was, and then being thrown into not just a different town, but a completely different country... that was a little overwhelming at first, but eventually I managed to adjust and get over it. I think I figured it out."

Can you explain a little bit more about that? About adjusting to a different culture?

When I came here, we had a fairly large Jamaican summer population. However, not many of them lived here year-round, so I think in the school there were maybe six Jamaican kids. And of course, we all stuck together. Because it's nice to have someone from your home country to identify with. But what was really challenging was learning that, no matter where you're from, people are going to judge you. Because in Jamaica we're very accepting. No matter where you're from, what you look like, your religion... we don't care. I learned coming here that there were the Jamaican Kids, the Bulgarian kids, the El Salvadorian kids, and the American kids. And that's all that mattered. And if you're American, you get split further down into sub-categories as well. So it was hard to learn that, despite the fact that I look at everyone else the same, other people aren't going to look at me and feel the same way. There was a lot of racism in high school."

What inspires you the most?

"I think the greatest inspiration of my life is my Grandma... everything that's good in this world, I've learned to see the good in people through her, because she was such a phenomenal person. She was the kindest, most loving person I've ever met. I always tell people, 'I wish you had known my Grandma.' She had so much wisdom... I feel like she left us way too early, and I get teary-eyed every time I talk about her. She had so much wisdom to share with the world."

Where do you see yourself in your future?

"Well, I can't say that I know where my life is going. I've always been a planner. I knew what I was gonna do fresh out of high school; what school I was going to, what I wanted to study, how long it was going to take me to finish... it took me 'till last year to finally sit down, and just having everything melt in front of me, and having to pick up the pieces, to realize that I planned things out so much that when something didn't go according to my plan, I didn't know how to handle it. So right now I don't know what I'm doing. I don't know what I'm doing tomorrow, I don't even know what I'm doing in twenty minutes, and I'm fine with that! I think that fear of ambiguity is finally gone, and I'm enjoying it. If there's one thing I know that I'm definitely gonna do (and this hasn't changed since I was ten years old) is to open an orphanage in Jamaica. There are so many homeless kids in Jamaica who don't have a safe place to be, and I want to be able say, "If you're down and out, and you need somewhere to be, come to my place and you will be fed, clothed and loved like you belong in the family.""

Any advice you'd like to give to the readers?

"There's a quote by Maya Angelou, it was one of my grandma's favorites. 'Do the best you can until you know better. Then when you know better, do better.'"
 

Subject: Shantaw Bloise
Location: Downtown Nantucket
Date: January 16th, 2016

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Robert Smith is a local landscape and portrait photographer. He will soon begin building a website to feature his work, and will also shortly provide links to his Flickr and Instagram accounts. He can be reached at 508-221-6926

by Rob Smith on Sunday, January 3rd

Tell us about where you're from.

"I'm from Bulgaria. A small town called Vidin. Lots of nature, rivers and woods... I had a pretty out-doorsy childhood."

When did you first come to Nantucket? And why Nantucket?

"In Bulgaria it's very popular for students to sign up for a program called 'Work and Travel.' It's for students only, and you can go anywhere and work for the summer, as long as you're back to study for the winter. It was 2008, and I heard about that program, so I applied and they had a couple job offers for this island off the coast of Massachusetts. I had never heard of this place before. My sister and I applied together; we sent a few emails, we got the job and we came here. We worked at Something Natural, and came back for four summers after that. Neither of us spoke English when we got here... it was very adventurous. I'm not sure I would do the same thing now, but when I was 18 it seemed like a good idea. And I'm glad I did it!"

How did you come to be here full time?

"I graduated from college in Bulgaria in 2012, and I thought I was done with my trips to the US. But then my boss offered me a work visa for eight months. I didn't have any plans at the time, so I figured I could come back for eight months. So I came for the summer, and I met the man who is now my husband, Andrew, on my first day back. We started dating, and here I am three years later! I work at The Bean now, as an assistant manager."

How do you like to spend your free time?

"I like to go for walks, and to make art... I studied interior design in college, so I've always been interested in art in general. I like to paint, make jewelry... And I love Skyping with my family in Bulgaria. Oh, and I love to drink coffee."

Do you have a favorite quote?

"'It's about seeing the colors where others only see shades of grey... it's about optimism...' - Anonymous"

Any advice you'd like to give to the people reading this?

"Smile!"
 

Subject: Ani Mulcahy
Location: Cisco Beach
Date: January 2nd, 2016

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Robert Smith is a local landscape and portrait photographer. He will soon begin building a website to feature his work, and will also shortly provide links to his Flickr and Instagram accounts. He can be reached at 508-221-6926

by Rob Smith on Sunday, December 27th

How long have you been on Nantucket, and what brought you here?

"Since 1980. A lady bought a house for her daughter, and she wanted me to work on it. So after nine months I decided to stay, and I like it. I've been here ever since."

Where are you from?

"Well, I was born in Brooklyn, but I've lived all over New York City, and up state."

What's your favorite part about living on island?

"You've got a lot of space. And it's really friendly here, even though it's pretty commercial. I know a lot of people, and that helps... to be able to chit chat and tell jokes. And that I can ride my bicycle anywhere. It keeps me in shape!"

What's your favorite joke?

"What happened to the turkey that go into a fight? He got the stuffing knocked out of him!"

How do you like to spend your free time?

"Karaoke. I really wanna be a good singer. I've been doing karaoke for 2 1/2 years. It's a good way of expressing yourself... I just need to work on remembering the lyrics. I also love to play scrabble. And I love taking care of animals. Oh, and getting coffee... love going down to The Bean for a cup of coffee. And of course I love watching the Patriots..."

You mean you're not a Jets or Giants fan?

"...No, no, I'm for New England. But I love the Yankees. Yankees for baseball, Patriots for football."

Is there any advice you'd like to give to my generation?

"Find something you really enjoy doing, especially if you're gonna do it for a living, and you're life is gonna be a lot easier."
 

Subject: John Luttman
Location: 'Sconset
Date: December 27th, 2015

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Robert Smith is a local landscape and portrait photographer. He will soon begin building a website to feature his work, and will also shortly provide links to his Flickr and Instagram accounts. He can be reached at 508-221-6926


 

by Rob Smith on Sunday, December 20th

What brought you to Nantucket?

"I came to visit in 1986, because my brother had come down, and my dad and I came down on Columbus Day Weekend.  We stayed at this old broken down house on Washington Street and I fell in love. So I knew the day after I graduated high school, I was like "Mom, Dad, just drop me off at the ferry", and I came over. I came over with $100, and a little backpack, and a bike, and I lived at Florence Frazier's house on Westchester Street. I had a job at the Sweet Shoppe, but once that ended I rode my bike out to the airport gas station, which had just been built, and I got a job pumping gas. Only girls pumped gas back then, which was very strange. But the owners were very kind to me. I worked there for a long time, and I met lots of nice people there. Back then, I could ride my bike in the mornings down the middle of Old South Road. I would just see if I could stay in between the two middle lines, and not a car would go past. Naushop wasn't there yet, it was just trees and the smell of honeysuckle, and roses... it was amazing."

What's your big focus in life right now?

"My number one focus is my family, and raising my children wholly, and maintaining our home. But as far as making money, gardening is my career. I also teach preschool on and off at Exploration Station two days a week. But with regards to gardening, I have five clients, and they're amazing people. I started out with fifteen, and when I had one child I weeded that number down to ten, and then I had another child so now it's five. My clients are people who are kind, and loving, and giving, and we have a friendship. I'll do anything for them and they'll do anything for me. We're just buddies. I can sustain myself with that, it's such a delight. And when I go to work, it's meditation and mindfulness, it's not work. Work is a gift. It isn't a chore."

What inspires you?

"Nature inspires me, and simplicity. I couldn't really work for a big company, using chemicals and stuff like that. I need to do something that helps the Earth in every aspect. I struggled for a long time after college, asking myself "What am I gonna do that's not gonna harm the Earth?" Making it more beautiful is what I found. That's what inspires me, is making the world a prettier place, a nicer place, a healthier place."

What advice would you give to anyone who might be reading this?

"Gratitude. Just be grateful for everything. Be grateful that we can wash the dishes and that we have water and soap, or that you have a roof over your head, or that you have a good friend. The more gratitude you have, then the more your dreams start arriving."

Anything else you'd like to add?

"Here's one of my favorite quotes. "My wish is simple. I wish each person warmth, safety, food and love." -Anonymous"
 

Subject: Caren Oberg Gomes
Location: Folger Ave
Date: December 19th, 2015

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Robert Smith is a local landscape and portrait photographer. He will soon begin building a website to feature his work, and will also shortly provide links to his Flickr and Instagram accounts. He can be reached at 508-221-6926

by Rob Smith on Sunday, December 13th

You must run into old students an awful lot, having been teachers for so long.

Mark: Yeah, a lot... I love our students. The year that Barbara and I retired, we drove 14,700 miles and we tried to just hug the coast. We went all the way down to Key West, and to New Orleans, and to San Diego, and then all the way up to the Canadian border, so we tried to cover the perimiter. I think, on that trip, we met maybe ten different students..."
Barbara: "We tried really hard to make contact, to meet them for breakfast... from all classes. Teaching is such a rewarding profession in that respect. Especially with Facebook, to be honest with you. It's opened up a world. People with whom we hadn't kept in contact will suddenly pop up and we'll go 'Oh my gosh, I remember them, they graduated in 1975!' And it's a wonderful feeling."

What inspired both of you, respectively, to become teachers in the first place?

Mark: "That's hard to say, you know? That's just a hard thing to say. I had no intention of becoming a teacher, but I grew up with teachers in my family (my mother and father), and it was easy to fall into. I got out of school and I was working one job. That job was building boats, and it was only a year-long job, and then I had nothing to do. And then, by chance, by sheer luck (I got a job teaching)... you know, it's always luck. There's more luck involved in success and happiness in life than people wanna believe."

Barbara: "I think I loved teaching from the very moment I started. I had so few good history teachers. I had some, but so many of them were so boring. I think that history is such an alive thing. When I think about Anna Gardner and Cyrus Peirce, and the people that I research, I feel like I know them. Their stories are alive, and I always wanted to make history alive. Because I think history is such a critical subject, knowing, you know, not just the past, but how things work, and about our rights, and our responsibilities. And I like kids. I like kids a lot."

Can you talk a little about life since having retired?

Mark: "It's wonderful when Barbara's doing her research downtown, at the NHA... I do photography work for her, you know, and I go to the NHA and get old photos for books and stuff... and I'd be in there for a week or so, and I would come out and Nantucket is still so old looking that you're not really sure whether you're in 2015 or back in the 1890's..."

Barbara "...Especially in the winter, and if it's dusk and there's no one on the streets... I can walk around and I can feel like I'm walking where these historical figures walked, and it's really real to me."

Mark: "I had been helping Barbara with some of her research about two years ago, and I came out of the NHA and they were paving that area right across from the Post Office... that little road that goes into the parking lot right behind there, and they had grated it all up. And I was so in that world with Anna Gardner in the 1840's... I happened to look down at the dirt as the tractor went by, and he rolled over a three cent piece from 1873... and I felt even more of that historical presence around me."

What advice would you give to students, and to new teachers?

Barbara: "For teachers, I would say find some good mentors. Because teaching can be overwhelming, and you have to seek out those who are gonna help you with your style of teaching. You have to figure out your style of teaching and how you're gonna reach out to the kids, and not be too uptight. Be firm and fair. If you're firm with kids, but also fair, they'll pretty much go with you anywhere. But for kids who might be graduating, that's tough... things are so different than they used to be. I would say be patient with yourself, and just because another generation had their career at 21 doesn't mean that you will. Yours might not be 'till you're 31, or 41."

Mark: "... it's hard to give advice from the past when the present and the future are so different nowadays. I don't think the world is the way that it used to be, where you could do an apprenticeship for eight years, and then become a journeyman and then two years later maybe become a master at something. We don't have lives like that anymore. But I do think that young teachers are very hard on themselves. It takes eight years to get a blackbelt in Karate. It takes eight years to become a doctor. It takes eight years to become a good teacher. It really does. Even if you count the last two years of your schooling, it's still gonna take five or six or seven years before you really hit a stride and become a good teacher. And I think an awful lot of teachers who could become good teachers leave after two or three years, because they just figure it's not for them. And I think we could have more of them stick around if the stress, pressure and the criticism of them wasn't so intense in the beginning."

Barbara: "And keep networking."
Mark: "I love that idea, keep networking. Because Nantucketers have a real advantage with that. Just by the simple fact that we live on an island, and that we have to rely on each other... and we are travelers. So we know how to reach out and identify when we're away from home."
Barbara: "And find a good partner. It's better go through life with a good partner than alone."
 

Subjects: Barbara and Mark White
Location: Bartlett's Ocean View Farm
Date: December 12th, 2015

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Robert Smith is a local landscape and portrait photographer. He will soon begin building a website to feature his work, and will also shortly provide links to his Flickr and Instagram accounts. He can be reached at 508-221-6926

by Rob Smith on Sunday, December 6th

Where do you see yourself in 15 years?

"Hopefully being a working professional actor. And I understand the limitations I have, visually and otherwise. I have mild cerebral palsy and a brachial plexus injury. But I have often just ignored that and just, in spite of that, just sort of said 'I've just got to work hard and do my best. If I give it all I've got, that's all I can do.'" 

What do you consider to be your greatest accomplishment?

"When I was on the Dolphins Swim team, to be able to have done that... and no, I didn't swim as fast as all the other swimmers, but to be able to have done the best I could with that... I feel really good about that."

Is there any advice you'd like to give to anyone who might read this?

"I would go with what Polonius had to say in 'Hamlet:' 'To thine ownself be true.' Don't worry too much about how much money you'll make, or what the neighbors will think... just be yourself and you will conquer the world in your own way. I'm convinced you that you will be OK if you be yourself. I mean, don't do anything negative. But artistically or whatever... if you want to do it, do it. I couldn't hold it against anyone for following their heart."

Subject: Wyatt Leske
Location: Atheneum Park
Date: December 6th, 2015

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Robert Smith is a local landscape and portrait photographer. He will soon begin building a website to feature his work, and will also shortly provide links to his Flickr and Instagram accounts. He can be reached at 508-221-6926

by Rob Smith on Sunday, November 29th

Can you tell us about some of your experiences in archaeology?

"I was working at Tel Gezer [Israel], which is an old site. The area that I was in charge of was about 1350 B.C.... very interesting. I had the good luck to strike a destructed level; an area that had been destroyed during a war. And everything that had been in the house was buried under debris and stuff like that. We found some interesting things, for intstance, the base of a big alabaster bowl from Egypt... a little Bes god from Egypt as well, a couple of Mitannian cylinder seals. It was a pretty sophisticated area. And that's the stuff I love. I'm very interested in the the pre-historic excavations, but frankly they're a bit boring, I find, to conduct. But when you get into the Bronze Age, it gets pretty interesting."

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What do you consider to be your greatest accomplishment?

"I feel my ministry on Nantucket... I'd see that as a lifetime accomplishment. Not that it was all that 'big time' of an accomplishment, but there are some things about it I'm quite pleased with."

Like what?

"For instance, getting Nantucket through the AIDS crisis, and helping to change the attitude towards gays, and founding the Nantucket AIDS Network. That took a lot more doing than one might imagine. It was difficult to get people to be open and honest about it. There were a lot of negative attitudes towards it... but sometimes you just have to go ahead and do what's right, or what you think is right, and sometimes it's painful."

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Do you have any advice for my generation (millennials)?

"Save the Earth. You're the last generation that will have that opportunity."

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Subject: Reverend Ted Anderson
Location: Two Sheds Farm
Date: November 28th, 2015

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Robert Smith is a local landscape and portrait photographer. He will soon begin building a website to feature his work, and will also shortly provide links to his Flickr and Instagram accounts. He can be reached at 508-221-6926

by Rachel Fabiszak on Monday, May 4th

"This is a photo of my Grandmother’s inn from the 80’s. She was born and raised on Nantucket and ran her Inn, The White House, for 40 plus years. This was her little photo and now I have it. The picture reminds me every day of how important photography really is. The old photos we have tell the story of our family and my grandmother’s life here on Nantucket. The photos are priceless to me. 

"As photographers we are always capturing a time, a place, and a moment that will never be the same. We are preserving these moments to show future generations. Nantucket is such a special place to call home and I love sharing our island through photographs. I love documenting our daily island life and all the great people who live here. It's also amazing to meet people who travel in from all over the world to spend time here. When they leave, I am happy to have created photos of their Nantucket memories that they can keep forever."

Subject: Katie Kaizer
Location: The Brant Point Inn
Date: April 29th, 2015

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Photographer and island native Rachel Fabiszak owns Rachel Fabiszak Photography.

 

by Rachel Fabiszak on Tuesday, April 21st

“What has been your greatest struggle and or challenge?”

“I struggled with depression and anxiety for years. I think it’s something to continue to bring into the light. It’s not something that a lot of people like to talk about. Once I came to recognize and understand it, I was able move through it and treat it. It definitely shifted my mind set. My biggest challenge was having that awareness and losing my mother and partner three years ago back to back. That was definitely my biggest period of challenge and struggle. But it changed my life so much and has brought me here into this place where I feel like I’ve healed a great deal. I still have struggles, as we all do. The beauty of it is being able to admit and face our struggles and move through them and with them instead of pushing those things away and resisting. Taking them on and facing them, and doing something with it.”

“The line on my business cards says “From Tragedy to Treasure.”

“We can take those challenges and let them eat away at us forever or we can find practices that allow us to move through them. And for me that’s what the bead work has been about and its how I have been able to connect with people. Through our struggles and through our celebration and all of it. Really drilling down to what makes us all tick and connect is what brings me the greatest joy now.”

Subject: Clay Twombly
Location: His studio at 2 Union Street
Date: April 15th, 2015

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Photographer and island native Rachel Fabiszak owns Rachel Fabiszak Photography.

 

by Rachel Fabiszak on Monday, April 13th

“The final straw was leaving on the boat one morning and I just looked at my husband and said it feels like I am leaving my grandmother’s house. My grandmother was the most important person in my life. The best family member ever.  The reason why I am who I am is because of her. We were inseparable, we were just instant.  I was her first grandson.  So to leave her house was so depressing and so sad. To leave Nantucket became that way. It was the fall the year before and I said to Mark we are going to live here, we have to move here period.  It was a need to move here. We wanted to move here. I love it here, I absolutely love it here.”

Subject: David Holland
Location: Miacomet Beach
Date: April 12th, 2015

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Photographer and island native Rachel Fabiszak owns Rachel Fabiszak Photography.

 

by Rachel Fabiszak on Monday, April 6th

“What is your passion?”

“I like learning new things, being exposed to new experiences, new places, and satisfying curiosity.”

Subject: Nell Van Vorst
Location: Weweeder Pond
Date: March 28th, 2015

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Photographer and island native Rachel Fabiszak owns Rachel Fabiszak Photography.

by Rachel Fabiszak on Sunday, March 29th

“My passion is food and my life really revolves around it. I wake up in the morning thinking about what I'm going to have for breakfast, planning out my lunch and dinner. I love thinking about where my food comes from. I’m very passionate about eating locally and eating seasonally. I like to know who my farmer is. I like to know how my food is grown and I like to know what I’m putting into my body and that’s really important to me. I also enjoy cooking and eating especially doing it with friends--that’s the best part.”

Subject: Amy Zielinski
Location: Miacomet Beach
Date: March 27th, 2015

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Photographer and island native Rachel Fabiszak owns Rachel Fabiszak Photography.

by Rachel Fabiszak on Sunday, March 22nd

“Spring is such a wonderful time of change, growth, renewal, starting over, and starting new things. So it is a wonderful opportunity to let go of old habits and old patterns. To find yourself free and open to possibility. When we let go of the old things that weigh us down and when we let go of stories that we get attached to that keeps us stuck. We’re not moving, we’re not growing, and we’re not changing. But, when we let go of that we create space for possibility.”

“If you could give one piece of advice what would it be?”

“To pause. To breathe. To notice. And to remember.”

“Why do you believe this?”

“Because the world that we live in now is a world that moves at an incredibly fast pace and so we forget to take those moments to just notice what’s happening around us. Notice the beauty that’s around us at every moment. And so when you take that pause you get an opportunity to notice everything and when you breathe you can take it in. So I think the world we live in can sometimes dictate the pace at which we move. And we have to remember that we’re the ones flying the plane. We’re the one that’s in control. Everything can continue to swirl around us to move around us at this incredibly fast pace but we still have the opportunity to pause, to breathe, to notice, and to remember. And that brings us to a place of gratitude and joy in everyday life.”

Subject: Joann Burnham
Location: Bartlett's Oceanview Farm
Date: March 20th, 2015

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Photographer and island native Rachel Fabiszak owns Rachel Fabiszak Photography.

by Rachel Fabiszak on Monday, March 9th

“I was diagnosed with stage four cancer. So: coming to grips with knowing that your life has a finite number of years left in it, possibly only one to two years. It makes you realign your values. Also makes you appreciate everything around you so much more.

"Along with that comes the realization that you’re not in this struggle alone, coming from such a tight knit community, and that there are a lot of people that care about you. People that even were casual acquaintances are now really good friends that support you. It’s really a fantastic thing--it makes it a lot easier, it really does, because it’s tough to wrap your head around it. Part of my struggle of course is my finances which is now out the window. I have to survive off of very little. My friend gives me baskets full of vegetables to help me get good nutrition.

"I’ve had people leave things at the door even when I’m not home. I go to the doctors and come back and there are bottles of Bolt House Farm juices there. I know I had mentioned that to somebody, that I liked them.

"I’ve never been a person that really took a lot of notice of statistics. The statistics that I’ve been presented with I feel are just another challenge: to show that they are just numbers, and I am going to keep a positive attitude and surpass that by far. I have been through eleven forty-eight hours of infusions already, so I have done about five hundred hours of poison being pumped into my body. The only way to go at that, in my eyes, is a positive attitude, proper nutrition, and really load up on vitamins through vegetables and fruit before you go into an infusion. If you feel tired just rest.

"I am so happy that they do everything on the island here--it makes it easier.  Thank you to Nantucket Cottage Hospital and the people that are caring for me there. I think that they are top notch and they are doing an amazing job. I really feel I have a whole team getting me through this as well as the community.

"I don’t think I am going anywhere very soon; I got shit to do so I’m going to be here.

"I’m grateful--it makes you grateful. Every day when I wake up in the morning the first thing I do every day I have a ritual I look at Natasha’s picture, and looking at that picture and knowing that she only had twenty years in this world and was lost at the prime of her life really humbles anybody. After seeing that, how can you not be thankful for every day? I have her Ribbon--I keep it on my jacket until it’s my time. I think of her every day and I didn’t know her that well.

"Another reason why I know I’m a fighter. Caitlin Marcoux is my blood so coming from good stock and her being a survivor it makes me a fighter.

"Bad part about chemo is it’s perpetual. There is no plan to stop because of the stage I’m in. It’s going to be something that I do until I’m not here anymore as far as what they say. They say I will never be cancer free.

"The person that I am says 'don’t tell me I can’t beat this--haven’t you heard of miracles?' I had a spot on my liver that was 21 mm long and after eight infusions it was down to 10 mm and the last CAT Scan I just had it is now gone. Liver is in progress, my lymph nodes are back to normal size--they were twice the size they were supposed to be. My job now is fighting and being healthy.”

“If you could give one piece of advice what would it be?”

“To love the people around you and the people that you’re close to. Let them know every day that you love them. And don’t sweat the small stuff--it really doesn’t matter at the end of the day.”

Subject: Robert Souza and Huckleberry
Location: Nantucket Home
Date: March 9th, 2015

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Photographer and island native Rachel Fabiszak owns Rachel Fabiszak Photography.

by Rachel Fabiszak on Sunday, March 1st

“If you had one piece of advice to give somebody what would it be?”

“That you have to believe in yourself, because that’s where it starts. Once you believe in yourself I think you could really overcome obstacles knowing that you believe yourself to be able to do things like that. To be able to step forward, to be able to accept challenges. To believe in yourself doesn’t mean you won’t fail, doesn’t mean that you won’t make mistakes. You believe in yourself that you’re going to get it done. There will be trials and tribulations and false starts and missed steps. But you believe in yourself that it could happen.”

Subject: Joan Skar
Location: Bartlett's Ocean View Farm greenhouse
Date: February 27th 2015

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Photographer and island native Rachel Fabiszak owns Rachel Fabiszak Photography.

by Rachel Fabiszak on Sunday, February 15th

"It's all about the magic these hands can do to make you look and feel good about yourself."

Subject: Johnny Wright
Location: Joe's Barber Shop
Date: February 8th, 2015

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Photographer and island native Rachel Fabiszak owns Rachel Fabiszak Photography.

by Rachel Fabiszak on Sunday, February 8th

“What do you like most about Nantucket?”

“The community. I just love the community. Everyone is there for each other. Which goes hand in hand with volunteerism. I think it is a very close knit community. You can rely on other people if and when need be.”

“What is your passion?”

“My main passion is volunteerism. I think it’s very important to give back to the community that you live in and even beyond. I spent two years in group called AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps traveling the Mid West doing service projects. Volunteering just has always been a passion of mine. Which is why I founded Volunteer Nantucket trying to promote volunteerism on Nantucket and to connect volunteers with current opportunities on Nantucket Island. One of my other passions is working with children.  That is where I personally have dialed in the most are those volunteer opportunities. There are a lot of organizations out there. That is what I want to do connect people to volunteer opportunities that they want to volunteer in. You can volunteer just to volunteer but if you’re not passionate about the area or topic that your volunteering with it’s not going to benefit you and it’s not going to benefit the organization because you’re not going to be there 110%.”

“How did you decide that Volunteerism was your passion?”

“It just has always been instilled with me. My mother worked at the Nantucket Elementary School for twenty-three years until she passed away. Both of my parents have always put others first. It just has been something that we have done as a family. It is just how it is we are always willing to help.”

Subject: Katie Manchester
Location: Nantucket Elementary School at the Memorial Tree for Susan Manchester.
Date: February 6th, 2015

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Photographer and island native Rachel Fabiszak owns Rachel Fabiszak Photography.

by Rachel Fabiszak on Sunday, February 1st

 "I'm in my first year of teaching so everything is still really new to me and I am figuring out where exactly I fit in within the context of the yoga community.  Yoga has helped me so much in terms of accepting who I am and learning to love my self even if I'm not always exactly where I want to be.  One of the areas I am interested in studying more is Yoga and body image.  The lifestyle and practice of yoga helps so much with self-awareness and acceptance; helping you to get to know and get comfortable with your strengths and weaknesses without judgement. One yogic concept that lends itself well to body image acceptance is Ahimsa- the Sanskrit word for nonviolence.  This practice cultivates non-violence towards all beings, including the self.  Choosing to live mindfully and peacefully begins with each of us first.  The same concept as we must take care of ourselves before we can take care of others.  We need to learn to practice loving ourselves, our bodies, our minds and spirits before we can fully give that gift to to other people.  I'm excited to see what unfolds and to continue my education as a Yoga Teacher."

Subject: Evie Marie O'connor
Location: The Yoga Room
Date: January 23, 2014

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Photographer and island native Rachel Fabiszak owns Rachel Fabiszak Photography.

 

by Rachel Fabiszak on Sunday, January 18th

“What do you like most about Michael?”

“I love his soul and the person that he is. He’s also very sexy! He’s my friend, my lover, and my everything else.”

“What do you like most about Kirk?”

“I love his feistiness. He never knows when to shut up. He constantly challenges me and he keeps me on my toes. But, what I really love about him is the way he cares about everyone in his life. People that have done him wrong, broken his heart, and stepped all over him--he always finds room to put them in. He’s very generous with his spirit and his kindness and all the resources he has to offer. He’s kind and generous and a very intelligent man.”


Subject: Michael Grossman-White (left), Kirk Grossman-White (right)
Location: Brant Point Lighthouse
Date: Januray 16th, 2015

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Photographer and island native Rachel Fabiszak owns Rachel Fabiszak Photography.

by Rachel Fabiszak on Sunday, January 11th

“What’s your passion?”

“My passion is saving Pit Bulls, because every ten years or so another dog gets a bad rap. It started with Shepherds, Rottweilers, and now Pit Bulls. Pit Bulls were actually bred to be Nanny Dogs: a dog that was safe and someone to watch the kids. Instead a lot of people now look at them as fighting dogs. Mike Vick’s story has really been a motivation for me to make a voice for Pit Bulls. Mike Vick was a professional football player and he ended up having a huge piece of land down in Georgia. There he had a fighting ring and the things that he would do to these bait dogs were awful. A bait dog is just a dog that they throw in the ring for the other dogs to attack to prepare for a fight. Out of sixty to seventy dogs, two had to be euthanized. The courts were going to destroy them because that was the rule. Pit Bull groups said give us a chance, let us train them. This was the first time anyone stepped up and tried to make these dogs family dogs. And all of them were changed to family dogs except for two that had to be put down. But for the most part they just proved what kind of dogs they really were. They are the type of dog where it's statistically proven that your bath tub is more dangerous than getting bitten by a Pit Bull. Having the three kids which take up pretty much all of my money there is not much I can do except sit there and post on Facebook that this dog needs help and this dog needs to be rescued. Occasionally when I have and extra five, ten, twenty dollars I donate to places to Guardians of Rescue or I Love Pits so they can hopefully get a better home. Guardians of Rescue is my absolute favorite organization; they go above and beyond the call of duty and they do it for nothing. They do it because they love it and love the Pit Bulls.”

“Do you have a rescue dog?”

“Yes I have a rescue; her name is Tess. She was left in an empty apartment to die. Luckily I got her! The woman had her put on Craigslist because there was a Pit Bull ban in Maryland so she had to give up her dog. Which I think is uncalled for looking at the breed of dog and banning them from the state. My goal is to try to hit the lottery or when I grow older to get a piece of land with a small house on lots and lots of acreage. To be able to save and foster these dogs, get them rehabilitated and find them a great forever home. Every day I look at these stories and it’s so hard to know that all I can do is forward them on Facebook.  Some people have an issue with me posting these pictures of these dogs but, if I don’t post pictures of these dogs in different states they may not find their forever home. Hopefully someone will see them and know somebody in that state and forward it and they could have a home to go to. These dogs that need urgent care and a home may have to be in a situation where they need to be put to sleep and that just doesn’t sit right with me. People spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on buying a dog when there are hundreds of thousands of great dogs out there. There are even specific rescues with puppies. I know my friend Linda got her Pit Bull puppy from a Pit Bull rescue as an eight week old purebred. People don’t understand that there are actually purebred rescues. You can find any kind of dog you want out there. I just don’t understand why you would go to a breeder or a puppy mill for it. It’s just something I just can’t comprehend. So having Tess as my first dog I’ve done a lot of research on Pit Bulls themselves and seeing how ferocious people think they are.  They are not: they just want to cuddled up and be loved.”

Subject: Kristina Dagesse and her dog Tess
Location: Jetties Beach
Date: January 11th, 2015

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Photographer and island native Rachel Fabiszak owns Rachel Fabiszak Photography.

 

by Rachel Fabiszak on Sunday, January 4th

“What’s your passion?”

“My passion is dancing. Getting other people to join-in in a way that is fun for them. Just having them start and realize they can have fun doing it too.  I have always loved it myself. But I don’t want to do it alone. I wanna infect everyone with the bug of dancing. Just for fun--not for perfection, that is not important.”

“When did you start dancing?”

“I started dancing as a kid. I took dance lessons and then in high school I was on the dance team. Then I turned that dancing into fitness. I started teaching something that was called aerobic dancing back in the 70’s. And from there I got into the fitness world. Then four or five years ago I got into Zumba. I took my training and I came out of that training like I couldn’t believe I hadn’t found this before! I just loved it! I immediately called three people and told them you wouldn’t believe what I just did. It was the best thing I've ever done! I want to bring this back to Nantucket and I want everyone to like it. I just love Zumba. I love the way it feels in the class. I love getting everybody going. It’s just so much fun. I could have a really bad long day and go there--it’s like for some people like having a glass of wine. I don’t drink but for me going to Zumba, everything is gone. It’s infectious, I think. Some people like it and some people don’t. Dancing isn’t for everyone. If you don’t catch the bug you don’t catch the bug.”

Subject: Betsey Minihan
Location: Betsey's Home
Date: January 4th, 2015

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Photographer and island native Rachel Fabiszak owns Rachel Fabiszak Photography.

by Rachel Fabiszak on Sunday, December 28th

What is your passion?

I would say my passion is fitness and being a personal trainer.  I just like exercising with people and getting them to move. I like getting people to see something new inside of themselves and make them feel stronger. Fitness for sure!

Why did you choose to be a personal trainer?

It had a lot to do with Nantucket Health Club specifically. I just liked going there, the people that worked there, the owner, and my friend Jonathan who worked there. It just felt like a family. I was so comfortable exercising, getting stronger myself, and learning. Then I had an epiphany one day. I was gardening and I just thought you know oh my god I think I am going to become a personal trainer. It just feels right. I am obsessed with exercising right now. I was bringing people to the health club with me every other week. They made a joke like who is going to last the longest with Jasmine.  They would laugh at me every week.  It just felt so amazing for me that I wanted to share that with other people. I wanted to show people that you can become stronger and stay healthy and fit.

Subject: Jasmine Cruz
Location: Nantucket Health Club
Date: December 19th, 2014

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Photographer and island native Rachel Fabiszak owns Rachel Fabiszak Photography.

by Rachel Fabiszak on Sunday, December 21st

"What is your passion?"

"Growing food. I love farming. I love being in the fields and continuing the tradition of agriculture in New England. It's important to me. I learn from the land more and more as the years go by."

Subject: Andrew Spollett
Location: Bartlett's Farm
Date: December 14th, 2014

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Photographer and island native Rachel Fabiszak owns Rachel Fabiszak Photography.
 

 

by Rachel Fabiszak on Sunday, December 14th

“What makes you happy?”

“What makes me happy I would have to say would be peace of mind. I discovered that about five years ago. I was so busy worrying about the next day and what would happen. And then I figured I needed to put some things in order in my life. I then discovered piece of mind. It’s the most beautiful thing. I would wake up every morning in fear of anxiety but, it's gone, it’s not there anymore. I wake up with a fresh start. Things may not go my way but, life still goes on. Peace of mind is the most beautiful thing one could have. It was a hard process and it took me awhile.”

“How did you get there?”

Well I like to write a lot. I am not very vocal sometimes but, I love to write a lot. I sit down and read my diary and say to myself why did I do this? Why am I giving that person the satisfaction? How did I end up in this position? What can I do to make it better? One of the people that have inspired me the most is Joel Osteen. He is one of the most well known evangelists in the country. I listen to him every Tuesday night. His sermons always are appealing to me. He is one of those people that inspire me to do better and my friends too. I know there’s somewhere in me that’s stronger and can do better.  Plus, I have my daughter who looks up to me.”

Subject: Cavel Mattison
Location: Squam Swamp
Date: December 12th, 2014

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Photographer and island native Rachel Fabiszak owns Rachel Fabiszak Photography.

by Rachel Fabiszak on Sunday, December 7th

"I feel that I am a misunderstood person."

"How do you feel misunderstood?"

"I think people's perception of who I am is different then from who I really am. If people took the time to get to know me they would get to know who I really am. I've never been a talker. I've always been a quiet thinker, an observer, a listener. It's the quiet ones who often get misunderstood."

Subject: Renee Gillies
Location: Wauwinet Harbor
Date: November 16th, 2014

Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Photographer and island native Rachel Fabiszak owns Rachel Fabiszak Photography.

 

by Rachel Fabiszak on Sunday, November 30th

"I'd rather buy a plane ticket than have a car payment every month."

Subject: Kristen Kellogg
Location: Gardner Farm 
Date: November 14th, 2014


Humans of Nantucket, modeled after the famous Humans of New York, intends to portray various members of the island community who share with us their lives, dreams and hopes.

Photographer and island native Rachel Fabiszak owns Rachel Fabiszak Photography.

 

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